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Did Stonington Public Schools Go After Orwell?

February 3, 2017 By Staff
Did Stonington Public Schools Go After Orwell?

Orwell fans can find some irony in his writing becoming the topic of “book bans” in Connecticut.

With so much going on in terms of Connecticut’s education, it can be hard to focus. A recent judgement has caused Connecticut’s leaders to re-evaluate the future of Connecticut’s education system. More from the New York Times:

In a decision that could fundamentally reshape public education in Connecticut, the state was ordered on Wednesday to make changes in everything from how schools are financed to which students are eligible to graduate from high school to how teachers are paid and evaluated.

With so much going on, it’s easy to miss that Stonington Public Schools are currently being questioned about “banned books.” After a “realignment” in Stonington’s curriculum, students found that books written by George Orwell, like Animal Farm, were removed from the school’s “anchor books”:

Superintendent of Schools Van Riley stressed to a group of parents and the school board Thursday night that the district has not banned the book “Animal Farm” from the eighth-grade reading list but a decision was made during a realignment of curriculum that it would not be among a group of “anchor books” used by all teachers.

While the school board insists that the book is not banned, parents, teachers and some teachers are not satisfied. In today’s political climate, 1984, another Orwell classic, claims the top of Amazon’s bestsellers list. Orwell fans can find some irony in his writing becoming the topic of “book bans” in Connecticut. The Stonington School Board has promised future conversation on the “Animal Farm issue” at its next board meeting in February.