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Double Standard? After Uproar Over Conservative Speaker, Nothing for Ex-Communist Davis

February 5, 2018 By Staff
Double Standard? After Uproar Over Conservative Speaker, Nothing for Ex-Communist Davis

The University of Hartford (UHart) is not in the news, despite a recent event with a former communist on campus.

Invited by and with support from the University of Hartford, “A Conversation with Angela Davis” took place February 2 at the university.

Davis is a controversial figure, once on the FBI’s “Most Wanted List.” She was a prominent counterculture activist of the 1960s. Davis held relations with the Black Panther Party and was a leader of the Communist Party USA. Her travels included communist Cuba in the 1970s, where she met with Assata Shakur and was received by Fidel Castro.

In 1979, she was awarded the Lenin Peace Prize from the Soviet Union, and in 1980 and 1984 would unsuccessfully run on the Communist Party ticket for vice president of the United States.

While provocative conservative speakers caused controversy that required school administrators at places like UConn to make counseling available for students, it seems far-left individuals invited to foster “UHart Unity” are not worthy of such measures, in ways confirming a bias felt by some towards conservative speakers in higher education.

College campuses have historically been places of free speech and higher debate, exposing students to differing or controversial opinions, spaces where all corners of the political and ideological spectrum are permitted the opportunity to participate.

As with UHart’s “Conversation with Angela Davis,” those opportunities have been provided without the need for security, counselors, or newsworthy headlines.