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Even a Progressive Outlet Realizes Something’s Wrong With Connecticut

June 5, 2017 By Staff
Even a Progressive Outlet Realizes Something’s Wrong With Connecticut

Slate offers no solutions, other than to dismiss any Republican ideas

A recent article from progressive bastion Slate outlines the decade-long build up of what are now massive economic challenges that face Connecticut.

While it’s been a long time for liberals like the ones at Slate to recognize that Connecticut is in trouble, the progressive outlet acknowledges the problem finally, yet still fails when it comes to a full diagnosis:

Naturally, the state’s Republicans have blamed the exodus on high taxes, an unfriendly business climate, and expanded social welfare programs. But the financial services firm UBS moved to Manhattan.

Slate sticks to their politics, brushing off “Republican” concerns, but some facts are indisputable: Connecticut’s taxes make for some of the highest costs of living in the country.

Connecticut has also built, over years, a reputation as a bad place to do business:

What has pushed Connecticut in such a direction? There’s a long list of causes: burdensome regulations, the second-highest tax burden in the country, restrictive zoning rules, high costs of labor, a lack of meaningful regional cooperation, clogged highways, crowded trains, and overall inadequate public transportation.

From major companies fleeing the state, like GE’s relocation to Boston and Aetna’s planed relocation of its headquarters in Hartford, to small businesses, Connecticut has a negative business climate.

Hartford, once labeled “New England’s Rising Star,” is facing bankruptcy. Legislators are even proposing bribing graduates to stay in Connecticut:

Democratic leaders on Friday asked the Finance, Revenue & Bonding Committee to approve the bill, which could provide incentives to as many as 60,000 students a year, whose tax breaks would be based on their incomes during their five years of eligibility after obtaining undergraduate, graduate, or law degrees.

Slate some how concludes that it can’t be the liberal policies like “tax and spend” or out-of-control budgets. Rather Slate offers no solutions, other than to dismiss any Republican ideas as conservative propaganda and defend the ideals of progressive ideas:

The deeper, more daunting question is what besides a tax break will make Connecticut a place people want to live and work. The state still hasn’t found the answer.

Neither has Slate.