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Lamont, Other Dems Interview With Working Families Party. Here’s Their (Very Liberal) Agenda.

May 24, 2018 By Staff
Lamont, Other Dems Interview With Working Families Party. Here’s Their (Very Liberal) Agenda.

Connecticut Democrats are vying for the Working Families Party endorsement. The third party's legislative agenda is to the left of even Gov. Dan Malloy (D-Conn.).

Connecticut Democrats, including Ned Lamont, Susan Bysiewicz, and Eva Bermudez Zimmerman, interviewed with the Connecticut Working Families Party (WFP) on Wednesday, according to the CT Post‘s Ken Dixon.

Lindsey Farrell, executive director of the party, which has been pushing Democrats to the left, said that Ned Lamont, the endorsed Democrat for governor was among those quizzed in the party’s Hartford office. The interviews started at about 9:30 and finished shortly after noon. The party also interviewed lieutenant governor candidates Susan Bysiewicz and Eva Bermudez Zimmerman, as well as attorney general candidates William Tong and Chris Mattei.

Lamont praised WFP last week, according to the third party’s Twitter profile.

However, WFP’s 2018 legislative agenda was far to the left of even Gov. Dan Malloy (D-Conn.). That could raise concerns among moderate and conservative voters that Lamont, if he embraces WFP, would govern to the left of Malloy.

WFP’s 2018 agenda included:

  • $15-per-hour minimum wage
  • Paid family and medical leave “with limited to no carve-outs”
  • Pro-union measures like “support[ing] efforts to expand unions in new industry sectors” and opposing “right to work”
  • Protecting Hartford from bankruptcy
  • Raising the income tax rate on high earners
  • Creating a tax (WFP calls it a “fee”) “on large, low-wage employers who rely on state assistance to provide employee benefits”
  • Opposing charter schools

Will WFP endorse Lamont? Will Lamont, in turn, endorse WFP’s agenda? These are all questions that remain open, and will be on voters’ minds, this summer and fall.